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Ketamine Pain Quotes for the

Ketamine Infusion for Pain Relief Institute

(KIPRI) Website

“If we use [Ketamine] in the right dose and in the right arena, it can be very helpful for pain” Robert Bonakdar, MD, Director of Pain Management, Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine, La Jolla, CA.

“In my 26-year career in the military, the deaths that I’ve seen from pain management have been from opioids. I often say, if only the drug in that machine had been Ketamine, those people would be alive today.” Col. Chester ‘Trip’ Buckenmaier MD, Director, Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Washington DC

“To our knowledge, there has never been a report of any other drug or somatic treatment [for] sleep deprivation, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, antidepressant, dexamethasone, or electroconvulsive therapy, that results in such a dramatic rapid and prolonged response with a single administration [of Ketamine]” Dr Carlos Zarate, Chief, of Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health

“Ketamine has a wide margin of safety; several instances of unintentional administration of overdoses of Ketamine (up to ten times that usually required) have been followed by prolonged but complete recovery.”  FDA-approved drug insert

“If you start patients at an undetectably low dose [of Ketamine] and increase it slowly, they start noticing an improvement in their quality of life without side effects.” Dr Lucinda Grande, Department of Family Medicine University of Washington, Seattle

“Ketamine may be used most effectively to reduce the symptoms of Allodynia (pain following normally non-painful stimuli), Hyperalgesia (increased sensitivity to pain), and Hyperpathia (exaggerated pain after minor stimuli) rather than acting as a traditional analgesic” Dr G Hocking, Pain Management and Research Centre, University of Sydney, Australia

 

Chronic / Back Pain

“Some of my patients were addicted to pain medications because they were having problems with chronic pain, I noticed that if during their eight-hour detox procedure I added Ketamine into the infusion, there were often dramatic improvements on their chronic pain” Dr. Glen Brooks, anesthesiologist, New York Ketamine Infusions Center, Manhattan

“I have been using . . . Ketamine for my chronic pain patients and have been seeing amazing results” Dr Lucinda Grande, Department of Family Medicine University of Washington, Seattle

“[Ketamine] stops the transmission of pain from the body to the spine and to the brain, and gives the system the chance to reboot” Dr. Glen Brooks, anesthesiologist, New York Ketamine Infusions Center, Manhattan

“I will use . . . Ketamine for chronic pain patients who are not on opiates yet as kind of a technique to prevent them from getting on to opiates, and most people in the study who were already on opiates were able to get down to a lower dose with the use of Ketamine.” Dr Lucinda Grande, Department of Family Medicine University of Washington, Seattle

“It’s a profoundly valuable drug as [a painkiller], Ketamine became something that we were falling back on when everything else was maxed-out and failing.” Col. Chester ‘Trip’ Buckenmaier MD, Director, Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Washington DC

 

Neuropathic Pain

“Among patients still on Ketamine, 75% were improved, and the ones that discontinued Ketamine showed no improvement in their clinical status,” Dr Lucinda Grande, Department of Family Medicine University of Washington, Seattle

 “We know about the NMDA effects and there also is the known [Ketamine] analgesic effect on neuropathic pain at the spinal cord level, and I think those are two different mechanisms that may be synergistic in people with chronic pain” Dr Lucinda Grande, Department of Family Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle

“If someone breaks a bone and you simply put the two pieces back together, they won’t immediately heal. However, if you add a splint and hold the bones steady for a period of time, and then later take away the splint the bone is healed. I believe that the Ketamine treatment does something similar that lends support and allows the nerve cells to heal themselves, so that when you take away the Ketamine, the pain is reduced or gone.” Ronald Harbut, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center

“[Ketamine] may therefore offer a safe alternative for recalcitrant neuropathic pain in an outpatient setting” Dr Elvis Rema, New York Presbyterian Hospital

 

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

“80 percent [of CRPS patients] see dramatic reduction in their pain with lasting improvement” Dr. Glen Brooks, anesthesiologist, New York Ketamine Infusions Center, Manhattan

“Ketamine blocks the NMDA receptors and gives a chance for the neuron to go back to the way it was before. In a way, it’s rebooting your pain system.” Dr. Aradillas Lopez, Vincera Core Physicians, Hahnemann University Hospital

“This pain disorder is very difficult to treat. Currently-available therapies, at best, oftentimes only make the pain bearable for many CRPS sufferers. In our retrospective study, some patients who underwent a low-dose infusion of Ketamine experienced complete relief from their pain, suggesting that this therapy may be an option for some patients with intolerable CRPS.” Ronald Harbut, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center

“We believe in the significant benefits of Ketamine intravenous infusions in the treatment and management of a specific subgroup patients with CRPS” who “have failed many abortive and preventive medications,” Dr Clinton Lauritsen, Headache Fellow, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia

Orofacial Pain

“I tell patients that there’s a 50-50 chance you may be get better. Reversal of central sensitization by NMDA-receptor antagonists such as Ketamine is believed to reduce pain and may reduce the amount of opioid analgesics patients need as well.  Magdalena Anitescu, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Pain Medicine Program Director, University of Chicago

“Ketamine [is an] alternative treatment and definitely indicated in particularly difficult cases.” Dr Ruben Abagyan, Professor, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego

 “Ketamine [blocks] the excitatory action of glutamate. Glutamate has been implicated in the activation of trigeminal nociceptive neurons [and may] play a role in central sensitization.” Dr Clinton Lauritsen, Headache Fellow, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia

 

Fibromyalgia

“These patients are really suffering, and many have lost hope. We are able to reduce pain levels dramatically for many patients. Just seeing Kathryn’s remarkable recovery is a blessing for us all,” Dr. Ashraf Hanna, Florida Spine Institute, Clearwater, Florida

Ketamine given intravenously is a more potent pain reliever than morphine for fibromyalgia. National Institutes of Health study, Pubmed/8610220. Dr J Sörensen, Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden

In one study, more than half of the patients who were treated with IV Ketamine reported at least a 50% decrease in their pain levels.  National Institutes of Health study, Pubmed/10781923Dr T Graven-Nielsen, Laboratory for Experimental Pain Research, Aalborg University, Denmark

 “Ketamine reduces pain in about 50% of [our] fibromyalgia patients.  Dr. Jay Goldstein, Director of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Institute, Orange, California.

 

Migraine / Chronic Headache

“We need to bring in unusual treatments for those tough cases, such as patients with chronic resistant headache, these are not doses at a level that will produce sedation, but at levels that can help block the pain,” Hisham Hakim, MD, Neurologist, Chairman American Spine Center, Birmingham, AL.

“Ketamine . . might be useful for someone not getting better with typical treatments.” Dr Duren Ready, Headache Specialist, Baylor, Scott & White Health, Temple, TX

“It is biologically plausible that Ketamine could be an effective treatment for intractable headache” in patients who “have failed many abortive and preventive medications.” Ronald Harbut, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center

“Ketamine is an antagonist at NMDA receptors, blocking the excitatory action of glutamate, a neurotransmitter long implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine.” Ronald Harbut, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center

[Ketamine 25-mg doses reduce severity of aura in migraines] – “are not doses at a level that will produce sedation, but [are] at levels that can help block the pain,” Dr Duren Ready, Headache Specialist, Baylor, Scott & White Health, Temple, Texas

“We need to bring in unusual treatments [like Ketamine] for those tough cases, such as patients with chronic resistant headache,” Dr Hisham Hakim, Neurologist and Chairman of the American Spine Center, Birmingham, AL

“It is biologically plausible that Ketamine could be an effective treatment for intractable headache. Ketamine [blocks] the excitatory action of glutamate, a neurotransmitter long implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine” Dr Clinton Lauritsen, Headache Fellow, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia

Another [Ketamine] study showed that severe disabling aura was relieved in 5 out of 11 patients with hemiplegic migraine” Dr Clinton Lauritsen, Headache Fellow, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia

“Several anecdotal reports have touted the benefits of Ketamine in chronic migraines, cluster headaches, and chronic paroxysmal hemicranias” Dr T Rabben, Department of Pharmacology, Oslo University School of Medicine

 

Phantom Limb Pain

“This [study for phantom limb pain] suggests that at the subanesthetic doses used, Ketamine is generally a well-tolerated treatment,” Dr Kellie Jaremko, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia

“Ketamine analgesia [could] decrease the central sensitization purported to underlie phantom limb pain. The benefits of a Ketamine infusion are better pain control leading to greater engagement in the active recovery process. This may decrease hospital stays and decrease chronic phantom limb pain” Dr Eugene Viscusi, Professor of Anesthesiology and Director, Acute Pain Management, Sidney Kimmel Medical College

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